Why these 6 GOP senators voted against coronavirus relief package

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Sens. Blackburn, Cruz, Johnson, Lee, Paul and Scott voted no

After months of stalled negotiations, Congress finally passed a new $900 billion coronavirus relief package late Monday night with overwhelming support in the Senate, but six Republicans stood firmly against it.

Sens. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Ron Johnson, R-Wis., Mike Lee, R-Utah, Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Rick Scott, R-Fla., all stood firmly against the bill, which had been bundled with a $1.4 trillion spending bill to avoid a government shutdown. Their criticisms largely focused on the size of the legislation, both in terms of the dollar amount and the bill’s page count.

Rand Paul votes against coronavirus stimulus bill, slams big government for adding unrelated provisions

Reaction and analysis from Bret Baier on ‘Fox & Friends.’

After months of stalled negotiations, Congress finally passed a new $900 billion coronavirus relief package late Monday night with overwhelming support in the Senate, but six Republicans stood firmly against it.

Sens. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Ron Johnson, R-Wis., Mike Lee, R-Utah, Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Rick Scott, R-Fla., all stood firmly against the bill, which had been bundled with a $1.4 trillion spending bill to avoid a government shutdown. Their criticisms largely focused on the size of the legislation, both in terms of the dollar amount and the bill’s page count.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.

“To so-called conservatives who are quick to identify the socialism of Democrats: If you vote for this spending monstrosity, you are no better,” Paul said on the Senate floor.

“When you vote to pass out free money, you lose your soul and you abandon forever any semblance of moral or fiscal integrity,” he said, targeting his fellow Republicans.

Paul suggested that instead lawmakers should open the economy, cut obvious waste in the budget, and stop piling on debt for future generations.

Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla.

Likewise, Scott railed against what he believed was an unnecessarily expensive measure, warning that there will be consequences for taxpayers.

“Once again, in classic Washington style, vital programs are attached to a massive omnibus spending bill that mortgages our kids & grandkid’s futures,” he tweeted. “Therefore, I can’t support this bill.”

Scott’s tweet included a lengthier statement in which he lamented that “Washington doesn’t seem to understand that new spending today will be paid for by increased federal debt and result in a tax increase on families down the road.” He mentioned that his position is consistent with his history of opposing “enormous and wasteful” bills.

“The easy route is simply to go along as Congress continues to do harm to future generations of Americans, but I will not be a part of it,” he said.

Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn.

Blackburn recognized that the legislation will accomplish a number of positive goals such as the development and distribution of vaccines, assistance to schools, and help for small businesses, but claimed it was not worth the steep cost.

“I cannot support nearly $2.4 trillion in spending that will make recovery even harder,” she said in a statement. “I have serious concerns with provisions buried in the 5,593 page bill, such as expanded visas, Pell grants for prisoners, and households with illegal aliens receiving economic impact payments. For these reasons, I voted no on passage of this legislation.”

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