Trump acquitted of both charges in Senate impeachment trial

cnbc.com

The acquittal vote was the final step in a two-week trial marked by impassioned arguments from House Democrats that President Trump was a danger to the nation, and stalwart support from Senate Republicans.

Sen. Mitt Romney, who delivered a searing condemnation of the president’s actions earlier in the day on the floor of the Senate, broke with his party to vote to convict Trump for abuse of power.

The Senate on Wednesday voted to acquit President Donald Trump on both counts in his impeachment trial. Forty-eight senators, including one Republican, voted to convict Trump on a count of abuse of power, while 52, all Republicans, voted to acquit him. The president was also impeached on the charge of obstruction of Congress. The acquittal vote was the final step in a two-week trial marked by impassioned arguments from House Democrats that Trump was a danger to the nation, and stalwart support from Senate Republicans for a president who maintains a political stranglehold on their party.

READ MORE AT CNBC.COM

CNBC

The acquittal vote was the final step in a two-week trial marked by impassioned arguments from House Democrats that President Trump was a danger to the nation, and stalwart support from Senate Republicans.

Sen. Mitt Romney, who delivered a searing condemnation of the president’s actions earlier in the day on the floor of the Senate, broke with his party to vote to convict Trump for abuse of power.

Trump was accused of abusing his power by pressuring Ukraine to announce a probe into former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

The Senate on Wednesday voted to acquit President Donald Trump on both counts in his impeachment trial. Forty-eight senators, including one Republican, voted to convict Trump on a count of abuse of power, while 52, all Republicans, voted to acquit him. The president was also impeached on the charge of obstruction of Congress. The acquittal vote was the final step in a two-week trial marked by impassioned arguments from House Democrats that Trump was a danger to the nation, and stalwart support from Senate Republicans for a president who maintains a political stranglehold on their party.

READ MORE AT CNBC.COM

READ MORE AT CNBC.COM


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