San Francisco just had its second-rainiest day since 1849

SFGATE

On the last day of 2022, an atmospheric river parked over San Francisco. And it rained and rained and rained. There was so much rain that the National Weather Service announced the city saw its second-wettest day since record keeping began in 1849. In 24 hours, San Francisco’s downtown gauge measured 5.46 inches. That’s second only to Nov. 5, 1994, which beat that number by a hair at 5.54 inches. The historic downpour caused widespread flooding, road closures and even mudslides throughout the region. According to the National Weather Service’s Bay Area office, that single day of rain made up nearly 47% of the city’s December rainfall total. Atmospheric rivers are tropical storms. That means they’re warmer than typical winter storms and they can pack a punch; if there’s no wind carrying them along, heavy rain can sit for hours or days over a region. That’s exactly what parts of the Bay Area saw yesterday, as flood waters rose and rain continued unabated. In Oakland, records go back to only 1970, which means yesterday’s tally of 4.75 inches is the most ever measured. The previous record was set in January 1982. The third-rainiest spot in the Bay Area yesterday was Redwood City. It got 4.47 inches, the third-rainiest day on record since 1906. The Bay Area gets a break from the rain on Sunday, with clear skies expected for New Year’s Day. A second atmospheric river is in the forecast for Wednesday and Thursday, and it could potentially bring eye-popping amounts of rain, too. “Our soils will not be dried out by then,” National Weather Service meteorologist Brooke Bingaman told SFGATE Saturday. “All the impacts we’re seeing today will reoccur or be a little worse next week.”

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