Man who beat Macy’s manager throws brother under the bus. Gets deal of a lifetime

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  • The original charge Palmer had faced, “assault to do great bodily harm less than murder,” was a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison.
  • Palmer [will] be sentenced under the Holmes Youthful Training Act, which could lead to probation on a lesser charge of aggravated assault

The Michigan hoodlum who was filmed two months ago by his brother maliciously beating up a Macy’s store manager was quick to throw his brother under the bus while testifying before a Genesee County District Court judge Wednesday.

According to the black suspect, Damire C. Palmer, 18, the reason he’d beaten up the white Macy’s store manager during a viral June 15th incident was because his brother, Damarquay, had falsely claimed he’d overheard the manager use the n-word.

“The statement that he made was untrue, and I swung on [the manager] for no reason,” Palmer said in court, as reported by The Flint Journal.

When asked by Genesee County Assistant Prosecutor Patrick McCombs why his brother would lie to him, Palmer replied, “I wouldn’t know. I honestly wouldn’t.”

……

But the only one who could be heard using the n-word repeatedly in the video above was Palmer. Nevertheless, during an interview with the New York Post in late June, Damarquay doubled down on his original allegations.

He claimed the altercation had begun when his brother “got the shirt, just picked it up. He didn’t have it on physically. He just put it over his body. He asked [the manager], ‘Does this shirt look too little?’ And [the manager] politely said, ‘Yes,’ and continued back on the phone with the remark, ‘No one, just some n—r.’”

After an investigation, however, Macy’s announced it’d found no evidence to corroborate Damarquay’s dubious side of the story, not that evidence of the manager using the n-word would have justified or excused a physical attack.

……

“McCombs told the court that Palmer would be sentenced under the Holmes Youthful Training Act, which could lead to probation on a lesser charge of aggravated assault after completion of any programming order by a circuit court judge. The decision came after consultation with the victim,” The Flint Journal reported.

The original charge Palmer had faced, “assault to do great bodily harm less than murder,” was a felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

ORIGINAL COVERAGE AT MICHAELSAVAGE.COM:

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