Intersectional AmEx

City Journal:

The American Express Company has launched a critical-race-theory training program that teaches employees that capitalism is fundamentally racist and asks them to deconstruct their racial and sexual identities and rank themselves on a hierarchy of “privilege.”

According to documents that I have obtained from a whistleblower, AmEx executives created an internal “Anti-Racism Initiative” following the death of George Floyd last year. The initiative subjects employees to an extensive training program based on the core tenets of critical race theory, including “systemic racism,” “white privilege,” and “intersectionality”—a component of critical race theory that reduces individuals to a collection of racial, gender, and sexual identities, which determine whether an individual is an oppressor or one of the oppressed.

In a foundational session, an outside consulting firm called Paradigm trained AmEx employees to deconstruct their own intersectional identities, mapping their “race, sexual orientation, body type, religion, disability status, age, gender identity, [and] citizenship” onto an official company worksheet. After employees categorize their identities, they can determine whether they have “privilege” or whether they are a member of a “marginalized group” that is “underrepresented, stigmatized, or otherwise undervalued in society.” Thus, employees can judge their position on the intersectional hierarchy—presumably with straight white males in the oppressor position, and racial and sexual minorities in the oppressed position.

In a foundational session, an outside consulting firm called Paradigm trained AmEx employees to deconstruct their own intersectional identities, mapping their “race, sexual orientation, body type, religion, disability status, age, gender identity, [and] citizenship” onto an official company worksheet. After employees categorize their identities, they can determine whether they have “privilege” or whether they are a member of a “marginalized group” that is “underrepresented, stigmatized, or otherwise undervalued in society.” Thus, employees can judge their position on the intersectional hierarchy—presumably with straight white males in the oppressor position, and racial and sexual minorities in the oppressed position.

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