‘How Could the CDC Make That Mistake?’ SAVAGE HAS AN ANSWER

THREE ACTUALLY …

1- APRIL 3 2020 PODCAST: “Why is the CDC so worthless? Who’s in charge? I said ‘President Trump, wake up’. I have no idea who heard me.”

2 – APRIL 13 2020 PODCAST: “Demonic & power-mad bureaucrats in NIH and CDC.”

3 – MAY 13 2020 PODCAST: “The worst minds of my generation, Fauci and company.”

The Atlantic:

The government’s disease-fighting agency is conflating viral and antibody tests, compromising a few crucial metrics that governors depend on to reopen their economies. Pennsylvania, Georgia, Texas, and other states are doing the same.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is conflating the results of two different types of coronavirus tests, distorting several important metrics and providing the country with an inaccurate picture of the state of the pandemic.

We’ve learned that the CDC is making, at best, a debilitating mistake: combining test results that diagnose current coronavirus infections with test results that measure whether someone has ever had the virus. The upshot is that the government’s disease-fighting agency is overstating the country’s ability to test people who are sick with COVID-19.

The agency confirmed to The Atlantic on Wednesday that it is mixing the results of viral and antibody tests, even though the two tests reveal different information and are used for different reasons.

This is not merely a technical error. States have set quantitative guidelines for reopening their economies based on these flawed data points.

Several states—including Pennsylvania, the site of one of the country’s largest outbreaks, as well as Texas, Georgia, and Vermont—are blending the data in the same way. Virginia likewise mixed viral and antibody test results until last week, but it reversed course and the governor apologized for the practice after it was covered by the Richmond Times-Dispatch and The Atlantic. Maine similarly separated its data on Wednesday; Vermont authorities claimed they didn’t even know they were doing this.  

Read the whole story at The Atlantic