Biden repeats Obama’s mistakes by dissing Israel: Goodwin

The New York Post:

Israel can exhale. Yes, the Biden Administration does consider the Jewish state an American “ally,” the White House said Tuesday.

If that sounds like restating the obvious, you haven’t been watching the tortured briefings by press secretary Jen Psaki. Last week, she couldn’t bring herself to answer the ally question directly, instead veering into mumbo jumbo about an “interagency process” and a nonspecific “relationship” between Israel and the United States.

Finally, Tuesday, she got to yes, but only after a reporter reminded her that she had declined to say the magic word last week.

“Israel is of course an ally. Israel is a country where we have an important strategic security relationship, and our team is fully engaged,” Psaki said.

Whew, glad that’s settled. So all is well, right? Not quite.

There’s still the issue of why President Biden, in office nearly a month, hasn’t talked to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. He’s talked to at least a dozen other heads of state since taking office, including those in Canada, Mexico, China, Russia, and Germany. So Putin and Xi yes, but Netanyahu no.

Psaki insisted the failure to speak to Netanyahu was not “an intentional diss.” So it was an unintentional diss?

Asked about the absence of a call again Tuesday, she said Biden’s “first call with a leader in the region” would be with Netanyahu and it will be “soon.”

Psaki, of course, can’t say clearly what she means because diplomacy forbids straight talk. But make no mistake, her point is that Netanyahu was too close to Trump and so the new administration is sending an unmistakable signal that the Israeli is no longer on the friends’ list. It’s business only and he’ll get his call when Biden feels like making it.

The dance resembles high school cliques, but it’s American foreign policy, Biden-style, where the main thrust is reversing what Trump did and turning back the clock to the Obama-Biden administration, which many Americans and Israelis don’t remember as the good old days. In Israel, Obama at one point registered single-digit poll approval.

Still, the old approach is new again, or as Psaki put it, “I can assure you that this president is not looking to the last presidency as the model for his foreign policy moving forward.”

In fact, in the mideast, Biden definitely should look to Trump as a model because the former president fixed what was long broken. Trump’s policy of fully embracing Israel, moving our embassy to Jerusalem, standing up to Iran’s aggressions and refusing to give into the obstructionist Palestinians created historic alliances between Israel and Arab states.

When Trump took office, two Muslim nations, Egypt and Jordan, recognized Israel and had diplomatic relations, a situation that hadn’t changed since 1994.

When he left office, that number stood at six, with the addition of the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Morocco and Sudan. This was a monumental achievement, yet Biden resents it rather than embracing and expanding it.

Still, the old approach is new again, or as Psaki put it, “I can assure you that this president is not looking to the last presidency as the model for his foreign policy moving forward.”

In fact, in the mideast, Biden definitely should look to Trump as a model because the former president fixed what was long broken. Trump’s policy of fully embracing Israel, moving our embassy to Jerusalem, standing up to Iran’s aggressions and refusing to give into the obstructionist Palestinians created historic alliances between Israel and Arab states.

When Trump took office, two Muslim nations, Egypt and Jordan, recognized Israel and had diplomatic relations, a situation that hadn’t changed since 1994.

When he left office, that number stood at six, with the addition of the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Morocco and Sudan. This was a monumental achievement, yet Biden resents it rather than embracing and expanding it.

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