72% of America’s Top Medical Schools Use Racial Politics to Eliminate Applicants

Seventy-two percent of America’s top medical schools use racial politics to weed out applicants, according to a review conducted by medical advocacy group Do No Harm.

According to the review, 72 percent of the nation’s top 50 schools and 80 percent of the top ten ask “probing questions to elicit responses from the applicant about his or her views on diversity, equity, and inclusion topics.”

The Duke University School of Medicine — ranked number six in the country — boasts that it has been “nationally recognized for its commitment to equity, diversity, and inclusion.” In an essay prompt for applicants to the school, admissions asks:

Potential sources of health inequities include race, gender, education, income, disability, geographic location, and sexual orientation. Moments to Movement (M2M) is Duke’s collective stand against systemic racism and injustice. The name signifies going beyond passive moments of reflection and becoming more active as we build to make lasting change for our patients, their loved ones and each other. Describe your understanding of race and its relationship to inequities in health and health care. [Emphasis added].

The number 14-ranked school — the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine — prompts applicants to answer the following:

We are interested in combating all forms of systemic barriers, and would like to hear your thoughts on opposing specifically: systemic racism, anti-LGBTQ+ discrimination, and misogyny. How will you contribute?

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